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Chief Joseph Indian Poses 1800s Vintage 8x10 Reprint Of Old Photo

ancientfaces: Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce This is a photo of Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce in He lead the tribe when the U. government was trying to force them onto reservation land in Idaho. [ Source Chief Joseph of the Nez Perce ]

Chief Joseph, Wallowa Nez Perce, (March 3, 1840 – September 21, 1904), Native name: Hinmatóowyalahtq’it

Edward Curtis photo Chief Joseph Nez Perce' - who died of a broken heart trying to fight to get his and his tribes' Indian rights back! One of Edward Curtis' most famous photos!

Red Fox James, a Blackfoot Indian, rode horseback from state to state seeking approval for a day to honor Indians. On Dec. 14, 1915, he presented the endorsements of 24 state governments at the White House. There is no record, however, of such a national day being proclaimed. (Library of Congress) 1915. Indians, American. Red Fox James at White House. With the State, War and Navy building as backdrop. Harris & Ewing glass negative.

1915 Red Fox James, a Blackfoot Indian, rode horseback from state to state seeking approval for a day to honor Indians. On Dec. he presented the endorsements of 24 state governments at the White House. Library of Congress

Nez Perce Chief Joseph poses in blanket outdoors, 1901 :: American Indians of the Pacific Northwest -- Image Portion

Nez Perce Chief Joseph (aka Joseph II), was hard to capture because he had fast horses. The horses were some of the original horses brought over by the Spanish.

An Afghan man offers tea to an American soldier. - Imgur

An Afghan man offers tea to an American soldier.

Afghan man offers tea to a soldier In this random act of kindness, an Afghan man offers tea to American soldiers on duty in Afghanistan. Notice the soldier in the background and the second cup of tea in his hand.

1840-1905 Chief Joseph was the leader of one band of the Nez Perce people (Nimi'ipuu). The Nez Perce resided in the plateaus, mountains and gorges of northeastern Oregon, southeastern Washington, and western Idaho. The legend of Chief Joseph and his famous retreat has long symbolized the loss of native peoples' lives and cultures in the late nineteenth century American West.

Hin-ma-toe Ya-lut-kiht (aka Thunder Rolling Over The Mountains, aka Chief Joseph, aka Joseph II) the son of Tu-eka-kas (aka Shooting Arrow, aka Joseph I) – Nez Perce – 1900

Three American Indians, Chief Joseph and two Nez Perce men.

Studio portrait of three American Indians: Chief Joseph (standing) posed with two Nez Perce Indian men.

ALIKUT

Ollokot (aka Alikut, aka Little Frog) the younger brother of Chief Joseph - Nez Perce - 1877 - till death

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