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Scylla urn | Winged, twin-tailed Scylla on an Etruscan urn. She holds two anchors. Taken at the National Archeological Museum, Florence.

Winged, twin-tailed Scylla on an Etruscan urn. She holds two anchors. Taken at the National Archeological Museum, Florence.

Sea monster. Sarcophagus or large urn with cover Italic, Etruscan, Hellenistic Period, Late 3rd century B.C. Limestone (possibly travertine)

Skylla, Etruscan urn, Late century B., Museum of Fine Arts, Boston. This object is one of five ash urns found in a tomb of the Velsi .

An ivory obi-hasami netsuke of a merman. Late 19th century 	With a humanoid head and holding his hands over his ears, the straight fish body with a curled tail fin, and a roundel carved with a coral branch amidst waves on his stomach. On the reverse a seal in raised characters reading Koku.

With a humanoid head and holding his hands over his ears, the straight fish body with a curled tail fin, and a roundel carved with a coral branch amidst waves on his stomach. On the reverse a seal in raised characters reading Koku.

Etruscan urn in Perugia. Scylla and Odysseus. Palazzone, Villa Baglioni. The Hypogeum of the women of the Velimna (Latin Volumni) family, found in 1797. End of the 3rd - 2nd cent. BCE

Etruscan urn in Perugia. Scylla and Odysseus. The Hypogeum of the women of the Velimna (Latin Volumni) family, found in End of the - cent.

French medieval image of Melusine, a feminine spirit, some say a goddess, of fresh waters in sacred springs and rivers.  She is usually depicted as a woman who is a serpent or fish from the waist down (much like a mermaid). She is also sometimes illustrated with wings, two tails or both, and sometimes referred to as "nixie" or Neck. - wicki

French medieval image of Melusine, a feminine spirit, some say a goddess, of…

Tourist touches fragments of colossal head and hand of Constantine in Rome, December 1962. PHOTOGRAPH BY ROBERT SISSON, NATIONAL GEOGRAPHIC

natgeofound: Tourist touches fragments of colossal head and hand of Constantine in Rome, December by Robert Sisson, National Geographic

Minoan Labyrinth Wall Plaque

Minoan Labyrinth Wall Plaque - This seven-circuit labyrinth dates back to 1200 BC in Greece. A single, continuous pathway winds into its center. It symbolizes the cycle of life, death and rebirth.

Woman drawing a liquid from a large cask and filling a small vessel. Detail of a funeral stele from l’Isle Saint Jacques, France.

Woman drawing a liquid from a large cask and filling a small vessel. Detail of a funeral stele from l’Isle Saint Jacques, France.

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