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"Feast/Festival of Fools" print engraved by Pieter van der Heyden after Bruegel, after 1570

"Feast/Festival of Fools" print engraved by Pieter van der Heyden after Bruegel, after 1570

Wonderful 'marital satire'. Where to begin? Uniquely in the Folger [this via their Luna website] -- first issued London 1628 by Hugh Perry -- this is the 1672 state -- only this plate had to have its caption erased as being evidently unacceptably scurrilous before it could receive L'Estrange's imprimatur. Note how old effeminated husband's wife is a 'roaring girl' who smokes and makes cuckold 'horns' sign at him while embracing her young lover -- women, eh?! Note cradle rocked by husband's…

Wonderful 'marital satire'. Where to begin? Uniquely in the Folger [this via their Luna website] -- first issued London 1628 by Hugh Perry -- this is the 1672 state -- only this plate had to have its caption erased as being evidently unacceptably scurrilous before it could receive L'Estrange's imprimatur. Note how old effeminated husband's wife is a 'roaring girl' who smokes and makes cuckold 'horns' sign at him while embracing her young lover -- women, eh?! Note cradle rocked by husband's…

A southern Netherlandish illumination, 1570-80, "portraying a ship of fools"; (The Hague, KB, 75 A2/4).  NO! NOT A SHIP OF FOOLS -- merely the normal' iconog for May -- the maying party of young lovers out in a boat -- there happens to be a single fool with them!     via Koninklijke Bibliotheek, via Europeana

A southern Netherlandish illumination, 1570-80, "portraying a ship of fools"; (The Hague, KB, 75 A2/4). NO! NOT A SHIP OF FOOLS -- merely the normal' iconog for May -- the maying party of young lovers out in a boat -- there happens to be a single fool with them! via Koninklijke Bibliotheek, via Europeana

Feast Fools & Jesters. (copy 18 cent.) Eng. MS. 16th cent. MS Douce b 4. Bodl Lib.

Feast Fools & Jesters. (copy 18 cent.) Eng. MS. 16th cent. MS Douce b 4. Bodl Lib.

the mooning fool from B's 1570+ 'Festival/Feast of Fools' print -- now I'm going to move all my earlier pinned mooning fools here! [Pause]

the mooning fool from B's 1570+ 'Festival/Feast of Fools' print -- now I'm going to move all my earlier pinned mooning fools here! [Pause]

the double 'cheek-screw' (1545) -- detail of previous. Who is the gesture directed at? Note that the 'action' of the print as a whole is based round the young woman (bottom left) stealing the older man's purse. Is our gesturer registering to the rest of the company  that he has spotted something going on? In modern times it seems to be only one hand that is used to make the cheek-screwing gesture, so that the modern significance may not be the same as this 16C double version.

the double 'cheek-screw' (1545) -- detail of previous. Who is the gesture directed at? Note that the 'action' of the print as a whole is based round the young woman (bottom left) stealing the older man's purse. Is our gesturer registering to the rest of the company that he has spotted something going on? In modern times it seems to be only one hand that is used to make the cheek-screwing gesture, so that the modern significance may not be the same as this 16C double version.

detail from the Paycocke's House "Allegory of Folly" (French, c.1600) -- the painting is full of significant gestures -- here, the finger in the mouth which I suggest owes its origin to the drooling of the 'natural' idiot . Note that the same gesture is made by one of the two "Nous sommes trois" fools.[other and earlier examples of this gesture to follow] -- photo by Alison Forrest, copyright National Trust. LOTS MORE PIX OF THIS REMARKABLE YET UNKNOWN PAINTING ON MY IMAGES OF THE FOOL BOARD

detail from the Paycocke's House "Allegory of Folly" (French, c.1600) -- the painting is full of significant gestures -- here, the finger in the mouth which I suggest owes its origin to the drooling of the 'natural' idiot . Note that the same gesture is made by one of the two "Nous sommes trois" fools.[other and earlier examples of this gesture to follow] -- photo by Alison Forrest, copyright National Trust. LOTS MORE PIX OF THIS REMARKABLE YET UNKNOWN PAINTING ON MY IMAGES OF THE FOOL BOARD

The earliest known nose-thumb ['lage Nase' (long nose) in German] in a Genealogy of Christ roll written c.1230 in Soest. Two of the dscendants of Ham appear to be quarrelling -- the African (note stylised tight curls) thumbs his nose at an Egyptian who is raising his finger in a warning/telling-off gesture. From Mellinkoff [see next for ref.]

The earliest known nose-thumb ['lage Nase' (long nose) in German] in a Genealogy of Christ roll written c.1230 in Soest. Two of the dscendants of Ham appear to be quarrelling -- the African (note stylised tight curls) thumbs his nose at an Egyptian who is raising his finger in a warning/telling-off gesture. From Mellinkoff [see next for ref.]

The 'weak in the head' gesture -- the fools self-label with the evidently ancient gesture of pointing to one's temple to indicate madness! Photo by Alison Forrest, copyright National Trust [CROSS-PINNED FROM MY "IMAGES OF THE FOOL" BOARD"]

The 'weak in the head' gesture -- the fools self-label with the evidently ancient gesture of pointing to one's temple to indicate madness! Photo by Alison Forrest, copyright National Trust [CROSS-PINNED FROM MY "IMAGES OF THE FOOL" BOARD"]

Women--masks and bustles. Maaerten de Vos. engrav. Antwerp ca. 1600. Met. Mus. | Note the masks... at least one is NOT dark.

Women--masks and bustles. Maaerten de Vos. engrav. Antwerp ca. 1600. Met. Mus. | Note the masks... at least one is NOT dark.

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