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Tupilak

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tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning


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tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilak - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilakker - Google-søgning

tupilak -Inuit Gallery of Vancouver -

tupilak -Inuit Gallery of Vancouver -

Tupilaq

Tupilaq

In Greenlandic Inuit (Kalaallit) traditions, a tupilaq (tupilak, tupilait, or ᑐᐱᓚ) was an avenging monster fabricated by a practitioner of witchcraft or shamanism by using various objects such as animal parts (bone, skin, hair, sinew, etc.) and even parts taken from the corpses of children. The creature was given life by ritualistic chants. It was then placed into the sea to seek and destroy a specific enemy.

In Greenlandic Inuit (Kalaallit) traditions, a tupilaq (tupilak, tupilait, or ᑐᐱᓚ) was an avenging monster fabricated by a practitioner of witchcraft or shamanism by using various objects such as animal parts (bone, skin, hair, sinew, etc.) and even parts taken from the corpses of children. The creature was given life by ritualistic chants. It was then placed into the sea to seek and destroy a specific enemy.

Tupilak

Tupilak

tupilak - Recherche Google

tupilak - Recherche Google

Inuit bone sculpture

Inuit bone sculpture

Tupilak Indian Mythological Bone Sculptures. It is definitive proof that Berkley, California was not first to experiment in the use of LSD 35.

Tupilak Indian Mythological Bone Sculptures. It is definitive proof that Berkley, California was not first to experiment in the use of LSD 35.

Tupilak Indian Mythological Bone Sculptures. It is definitive proof that Berkley, California was not first to experiment in the use of LSD 35.

Tupilak Indian Mythological Bone Sculptures. It is definitive proof that Berkley, California was not first to experiment in the use of LSD 35.

Tupilak Indian Mythological Bone Sculptures. It is definitive proof that Berkley, California was not first to experiment in the use of LSD 35.

Tupilak Indian Mythological Bone Sculptures. It is definitive proof that Berkley, California was not first to experiment in the use of LSD 35.

Carving of a tupilak (spirit) Eskimo collected in Angmagssalik

Carving of a tupilak (spirit) Eskimo collected in Angmagssalik

Tupilak (carved ivory) - unidentified Inuit artist

Tupilak

Tupilak (carved ivory) - unidentified Inuit artist