More ideas from Naja
Acanthostega, an early tetrapod from East Greenland

Fossils fill evolutionary gap between fish and beasts: Tetrapods found at Blue Beach, N., suggest so-called gap is just a poor fossil record (CBC News 09 May

Quetzalcoatlus northropi is an azhdarchid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl

Quetzalcoatlus northropi is an azhdarchid pterosaur known from the Late Cretaceous of North America (Maastrichtian stage) and one of the largest known flying animals of all time. It is a member of the family Azhdarchidae, a family of advanced toothless pterosaurs with unusually long, stiffened necks. Its name comes from the Mesoamerican feathered serpent god Quetzalcoatl

Raptor

Raptor

Almost elbow high to a dinosaur forelimb at the Zigong Dinosaur Museum in Sichuan Province, Zigong City, Dashanpu.

Almost elbow high to a dinosaur forelimb at the Zigong Dinosaur Museum in Sichuan Province, Zigong City, Dashanpu. We lived with the dinosaurs, right?

arsinoitherium fossil - This species were rhinoceros-like herbivores that lived during the late Eocene and the early Oligocene of northern Africa from 36 to 30 million years ago, in areas of tropical rainforest and at the margin of mangrove swamps

Arsinoitherium skull This species were rhinoceros-like herbivores that lived during the late Eocene and the early Oligocene of northern Africa from 36 to 30 million years ago, in areas of tropical rainforest and at the margin of mangrove swamps.

"Welcome home to one of the rarest trilobites in the world. Thanks to a gift by Robert Hazen, this fossil of a new Apianurus species is now a part of the Museum's collection. This beautiful fossil was discovered by paleontologist Jake Skabelund in 2011 at the Walcott-Rust Quarry in New York." --Deep Time at the Smithsonian Facebook Page

"Thanks to a gift by Robert Hazen, this fossil of a new Apianurus species is now a part of the Museum's collection. This beautiful fossil was discovered by paleontologist Jake Skabelund in 2011 at the Walcott-Rust Quarry in New York.