Rare Deep Water Shark | Rare deep-sea fish pictured

Rare deep-sea fish pictured Many deep sea fish display a show of spectacular colors, known as bioluminescence. Light is created when the ( protien or bacteria can't remember which pretty sure protien) Lucifern is broken Down.

chandelier that mimicks deep sea bioluminescence. Super cool!

Mesmerizing Chandelier Mimicks Deep Sea Bioluminescence (Photos)

Chandelier designed by Kateřina Smolíková is inspired by deep sea luminescent organisms. It is intended to be for darker places as an orientational light.

jelly

The Pink Sea-Through Fantasia (Enypniastes eximia). This incredible creature was only recently discovered. It is a species of swimming sea cucumber that was found in the Celebes Sea.

Ha! That's the cutest octopus on the planet

Dumbo Octopuses are named because of their ear-like fins coming out of their heads. They live in the extreme depths of the water, some living 7000 meters below sea level. Unlike other octopuses, they swallow their food whole! SO CUTE!

New Family of deep-sea crab from hot vents. Its conspicuous fur has given it the informal name, Yeti crab, after the hairy abominable snowman.

*YETI CRAB ~ New Family of deep-sea crab from hot vents. Its conspicuous fur has given it the informal name, Yeti crab, after the hairy abominable snowman.

The Ping Pong Tree Sponge, Chondrocladia Lampadiglobus, lives more than 1 1/2 miles beneath the surface of the ocean and is carnivorous. Photo by Claire Nouvian. #Ping_Pong_Tree_Sponge  #Chondrocladia_Lampadiglobus #Claire_Nouvian

The aptly named Ping-pong tree sponge (Chondrocladia lampadiglobus) is a carnivorous sponge. Those ping-pong ball looking things are covered in tiny spicules which the sponge uses to catch tiny crustaceans.

Captain Mutton Chops

Grimpoteuthis, also called Dumbo Octopus, is a genus of pelagic umbrella octopus that live in the deep sea. Prominent ear-like fins protrude from the mantle just above their lateral eyes.

little squid

"Little Squid" Category: Finalist -- Underwater Species Photographer: Fabien Michenet Location: Tahiti Winners of the Natural History Museum's 2014 Wildlife Photographer of the Year Awards

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Larval Leaf Scorpionfish (photograph by Chris Newbert, Minden Pictures). Lacking any other defense, many larval fish have adapted transparency as a method of camouflage—such as this tiny, see-through larval leaf scorpionfish in Hawaii.

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