The Deer Park Lyngby

Dyrehaven (Danish 'The Deer Park'), officially Jægersborg Dyrehave, is a forest park north of Copenhagen. It covers around 11 square kilometres. Dyrehaven is noted for its mixture of huge, ancient oak trees and large populations of red and fallow deer. All entrances to the park have a characteristic red gate; one of the most popular entrances is Klampenborg gate, close to Klampenborg station. All the entrance gates have an identical gate house attached to them, which serve as the residences of the forest wardens. Dyrehaven is maintained as a natural forest, with the emphasis on the natural development of the woods over commercial forestry. Old trees are felled only if they are a danger to the public. It has herds of about 2100 deer in total, with 300 Red Deer, 1700 Fallow Deer and 100 Sika Deer. Dyrehaven is also the venue for the Eremitage road race (Eremitageløbet) and the yearly Hubertus hunt (Hubertusjagten) which is held on the first Sunday in November. In former times it was home to the Fortunløbet race, later known as Ermelundsløbet, but this race was discontinued in 1960.
The castle Lyngby Deer park.

The castle Lyngby Deer park.

The Deer Park near Lyngby Denmark

The Deer Park near Lyngby Denmark

The Deer Park Lyngby Denmark

The Deer Park Lyngby Denmark

Beautiful light and lots of action on a lovely sunday walk in Dyrehaven just north of Copenhagen. These fallow deer boys are eager to test strength this time of year

Beautiful light and lots of action on a lovely sunday walk in Dyrehaven just north of Copenhagen. These fallow deer boys are eager to test strength this time of year

The Eremitage castle is the centre of the Royal Danish Deer Park, although it was built as late as 1735 while the Deer Park itself was already laid out in 1670. The Deer Park, the official Danish name being Jægersborg Dyrehave, was managed from Jægersborg castle; there was, however, in addition a small “castle” within the park which was later replaced by the Eremitage castle.

The Eremitage castle is the centre of the Royal Danish Deer Park, although it was built as late as 1735 while the Deer Park itself was already laid out in 1670. The Deer Park, the official Danish name being Jægersborg Dyrehave, was managed from Jægersborg castle; there was, however, in addition a small “castle” within the park which was later replaced by the Eremitage castle.

Eremitage Palace or Eremitage Hunting Lodge

Eremitage Palace or Eremitage Hunting Lodge

The Deer Park

The Deer Park

A trip in the park.

A trip in the park.

Deer Park Lyngby

Deer Park Lyngby

The Deer Park Lyngby

The Deer Park Lyngby

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